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ANNA’S SUMMER


AMIGOMÍO


LA AMIGA


DESEMBARCOS - When Memory Speaks


DAYS TO REMEMBER


MELEK LEAVES


IN THE COUNTRY OF MY PARENTS


MALOU


CONFUSION / DIFFUSION


MY GERMAN FRIEND


YOU CANNOT WIN WITHOUT FIGHTING


MOSCONI OR TO WHOM THE WORLD BELONGS


FICTIONAL LIES ON RIGHT OCCASIONS

   

ANNAS SUMMER

Germany/ Greece/ Spain 2001
A co-production of Malena Films with Integral Film (Germany), FS Productions (Greece) und El Imán, (Spain),
with the support of Filmstiftung NRW, BKM, Filmboard Berlin- Brandenburg, Greek Film Center, Ministerio de Educación y Cultura, Eurimages and in collaboration with Canal + Spain

Feature film, 35 mm, 107 min, original version in Greek, German, Spanish, English with English subtitles, synchronized in German
Shooting locations: Germany and Greece


Summary:

Anna Kastelano is packing up the home that had belonged to her family on a Greek island. She is considering putting it up for sale. However, in these familiar surroundings, she is revisited by memories of her own past and that of her Sephardic-Jewish family. Anna has not yet got over the death of her husband Max. She spends the summer on the island, which has become her second home, trying to come to terms with her solitude. For the first time, she opens the family´s iron chest. Memories and ghosts rise up, with whom she cooks, dances and picks figs. She finds old telegrams relating to the fate of her grandmother Anna. She also discovers the diary of another Anna, her father´s first love. But the present also makes itself felt. Anna meets Nikola. Her relationship with him and the feelings she is experiencing intermingle with her mourning and the moving discoveries about her family.


Comments:

"Anna´s Summer" is a film that crosses cinematic boundaries, and thus abandons the comfort of film genres to look at the unresolved, unlikely stuff of life. It is a film about the demons and friends of memory, and so addresses anyone who has ever left a place he wanted to stay or been left by a person they wanted to love. Time moves on, disinterested in our attachments.
"Anna´s Summer" is also a "woman´s film" that pokes fun at women´s films. Women artists are these days accused of being obsessed with the inner life, with emotion and self-reflection, in fact, with looking at their navels. And so the opening shot of the film is of a woman looking into a mirror at her navel. OK; let´s really do it. Yet, in the end, the motives of this woman, Anna, are the motives of men. Certain sorts of fun, sexual flings and fears get us all.
Finally, "Anna´s Summer" tells the story of a Jewish family during the Second World War but avoids the heated moves of many Holocaust movies which, as they are repeated, become expectable. The film describes plainly the nature of the people in Anna´s life, their illicit affairs, business deals, and how they can just get fed up with each other. "Anna´s Summer" looks at their impact on each other and on Anna, and in this it is more interested in psychology than in the epic drama of the Shoah. What kind of woman does one become-what kind of lover does one choose-if one had a father who was both generous and authoritarian, a mother who was irresponsible but also compelling, uncles who didn´t necessarily get along and who saved themselves but not others. In "Anna´s Summer", all these "movies" come together in the a-rational sequence of recollection. As in life, Anna does not remember logically....

Marcia Pally, February 2001


Press comments:

The kind of peacefully contemplative arthouse item that's become more the exception than the rule, "Anna's Summer" stars Angela Molina as a 50-year-old photojournalist who welcomes the friendly spirits of her Sephardic-Jewish ancestors to the family home she's inherited on a spectacular Greek island. Pic may be limited in contempo theatrical world by that very same trait but will resonate on the fest circuit, be welcomed by distribs who know their upscale auds and embraced in ancillary.
"Go away, ghosts," says Anna Kastelano (Molina) as she throws open her bedroom shutters to the sparkling Aegean Sea. But the spirits aren't so easily dismissed. Her recently deceased companion of some 30 years, Max (Herbert Knaup), still spends a lot of time with her, as does her father Leon -- who, it turns out, had a young lover named Anna.
She even learns a bit of the mysterious circumstances surrounding her grandmother's murder at Auschwitz. In between these daydreams and her spells of regional cooking, she finds time to develop a tentative relationship with laborer Nikola (Agis Emmanouil), who yearns to leave the island for the lures of the city.
As Anna wrestles with the decision to sell the grand house, the past and present intertwine with benevolent fluidity. Writer-director Jeanine Meerapfel exhibits a sure hand with the delicate business of bringing long-departed ancestors back to life, stripping the process of all gimmickry and sensationalism while gently subverting tenets of woman's melodrama. Molina becomes more beautiful as time and pic progress. Tech credits are clean and lovely, with camera of d.p. Andreas Sinanos (who shot Theo Angelopoulos' Cannes-winning "Eternity and a Day") caressing the region's rugged, sun-drenched beauty.

Press review by Variety.com (Eddie Cockrell, September 14, 2001)

 

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Director and script:
Jeanine Meerapfel
   
Cast:
Angela Molina, Herbert Knaup, Dimitris Katalifos, Rosana Pastor, Maria Skoula
   
Photography:
Andreas Sinanos
   
Sound:
Eva Valiño
   
Editing:
Bernd Euscher
   
Music:
Floros Floridis
   
Production:
Integral Film, Malena
Films, FS Productions und El Imán
   
   
Producers:
Dagmar Jacobsen, Fanis Synadinos, José Luis Borau
   
Awards:
Festival of Mar del Plata: Special Award of the Jury Further festivals: Jerusalem, Hof, Chicago, Montreal, San Francisco und New York
   
   
   
Film Festivals:
Montréal 2001, Chicago 2001, Mannheim-Heidelberg 2001, Hof 2001, Museum of Modern Art - New York 2001, Thessaloniki 2001, Lünen 2001, Berlin 2002, Mar del Plata 2002 (Sonderpreis der Jury), Innsbruck 2002, Shanghai 2002, Jerusalem 2002, Jewish Festival San Francisco 2002, Mittelmeerfestival Köln 2002 and others.
   
   
   
   
Distribution:
DVD-Box „Jeanine Meerapfel“ - Filmmakers Edition
Neue Visionen: info@neuevisionen.de
www.goodmovies.de
   
   
   
International distribution:
Malena Filmproduktion: info@malenafilm.com
   
Cinema distribution:
Deutsche Kinemathek: filmverleih@deutsche-kinemathek.de
   
Soundtrack-CD:
Floros Floridis: florosfloridis@gmx.com